Featured post

The Time Cheese Company Ltd is Up and Running!

                                                                                                                               ...

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

How Far up the Adoption Curve for Domestic DSR are we?

There are around 30 million electricity consumers in UK and as many of them as possible need to be shifting their time-of-use away from peaks if we are to avoid an extremely costly upgrade of the distribution system , as well as a ramped-up rollout of nuclear at £8,000/kW and rising.
That's the challenge. But how many are already doing so?

There are in UK around

  • 800,000 solar PV installation owners or tenants, most of whom take advantage of "free" electricity when the sun shines
  • 1.7 million storage heating installations, on economy 7 tariffs, using night-time electricity.
  • 0.1 million heat pumps, many of which are on smart connections
  • A few hundred thousand people like you and I who know that DSR is a good idea

So around 10% of domestic users, 3 million, have some awareness of the value of time-shifting, and most are at least taking some action where it is to their financial benefit.



So we are  at the end of the early adoption phase for awareness - the 10% of innovators and early adopters needed to get a technology off the ground.

Of course awareness and appropriate action are not the same thing, but awareness is a necessary precursor to action. 

Let's keep pumping the message out!

I am, are you?

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Is Solar in UK Like Solar in California?


On 3rd May, California had a capacity crisis. Their hydro power reserve had run out of water because of the drought, there was little wind, and the peak demand even in air-conditioned California was after dark. Demand side response came to the rescue thanks largely to Enernoc, and 800 MW was lopped off the  34 GW or so of peak demand, preventing large-scale outages. (The green net demand curve is net of solar PV and of DSR)
But look at how much of the near-peak demand is met by solar.
In UK , in winter, this would not happen. Our peak demand occurs several hours after the watery winter sun has already set. 
All the more reason, then, to be concerned about getting as much time-shifting as possible out of the winter peak. The alternatives to this are:
  • Power outages
  • More expensive nuclear electricity
  • More carbon emitting gas-fired electricity
  • Expensive and polluting storage
  • The energy trilemma writ large - unaffordable, unsustainable, unreliable electricity

So - be an early adopter, get ahead of the game, and prepare for next winter by planning to shift all water heating appliances out of the 3-8pm peak! Hundreds of thousands already time-shift, do you?


Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Where is Storage Needed?
















Is electricity storage a good idea? Where is it needed?

  • In the countryside, where the solar and wind power are generated?
  • Or in towns and cities, where most of the electricity is consumed?
Peak demand is an issue in the cities, but handling PV on a sunny day is a rural issue - so we probably will need both - but the more we shift our demand, the less expensive storage we will need - happy time-shifting!